Tag Archives: Jumps

“Simeon Toribio (1905-1969): A World-Class High Jumper” by Joboy Quintos

It has been eighty-years since Simeon Toribio won the high jump bronze medal from the Los Angeles Olympic Games. Ask any Filipino about Toribio and chances are, you’ll be met with a blank stare. I know for a fact that athletics in the Philippines is nothing more than a fringe sport. The days of Lydia de Vega are long gone. And despite the best efforts of our national athletes, the sport is hard pressed to break into mainstream consciousness.

Perhaps a look back into our storied athletics history could bring back a sense of pride, and lift our collective desensitation from decades of being sporting minnows.

I first read about the exploits of Toribio and Miguel White back in college, through the fine book entitled “Philippine Sporting Greats.” White, winner of the 400m hurdles bronze in Berlin, died during the Japanese invasion at the early stages of the Second World War. The Bohol-born Toribio, fortunately, survived that terrible episode and lived well into his sixties.

Toribio was a renaissance man in every sense of the word. In my readings of Jorge Afable’s “Philippine Sports Greats”, I was amazed at how he balanced a full-time job with a no non-sense athletics training regimen.[1] In his heyday, the tall Toribio reigned supreme in Asian high jumping circles. In a thirteen year period spanning from 1921 to 1934,[2] the Filipino champion won a staggering five gold medals in Far Eastern Games, the precursor to today’s Asian Games.

The Filipino made his Olympic debut in Antwerp back in 1928.[3] Bob King won gold with a superior mark of 1.94m.[4] The next four jumpers, Toribio included, had identical jumps of 1.91m.[5] However, Toribio missed out on the bronze in the ensuing jump-off.[6]

He reached the pinnacle of his career in Los Angeles, where he sailed over 1.97m to win bronze. The 1932 Summer Olympics was the Philippines’ most successful foray into the World’s Greatest Show, with three bronze medals. Teofilo Yldefonso snared his second Olympic third place finish in as many attempts, while boxer Jose Villanueva grabbed the bronze medal in the bantamweight division.

The high jump competition in Los Angeles was a long drawn battle, taking four hours according to Afable. With the top four jumpers all tied with clearances of 1.97m, another jump-off was held to determine the placings.[7] The competitors all failed to clear 2.007m and 1.99m.[8] The gold was awarded to Canada’s Daniel McNaughton, who had a first-time clearance over 1.97m, [9] while Bob Van Osdel of the United States took the silver.

Toribio at the 1936 Los Angeles Olympics. (Photo from the 1932 Los Angeles Olympics Program/LA84 Foundation)

Afable wrote about a peculiar competition rule from that era that required athletes to stay at the competition grounds during the entire event, and opined that had Toribio not been burdened by the “call of nature,” he could have cleared 2.007m.[10] Coming into the Games, the Filipino had a personal best of 2.00m set in 1930. Perhaps because of discomfort, the then 26-year old Toribio took three attempts[11] to negotiate 1.94m and 1.97m – heights well within his capabilities.

A helpful Japanese coach lent a blanket for Toribio to cover himself in as he relieved his bladder!

The world record at that time was at 2.03m, with the Olympic record at 1.98m.

McNaughton, Toribio, and Van Osdel. (Photo from the 1932 Los Angeles Olympics Program/LA84 Foundation)

Toribio competed at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, his third Olympiad, but finished outside the medals. During the War, he narrowly escaped arrest by the Kempeitai when a Japanese officer saw one of Toribio’s mementoes from an athletics competition in Japan (If my memory serves me right, it was a memento from the 1923 Far Eastern Games in Osaka. I’d have to verify this by reading “Philippine Sports Greats” again).[12] Since it was the Japanese emperor’s birthday, the Kempeitai officer spared Toribio.[13]

The Filipino high jumper went on to become a congressman in his native Bohol, serving his constituents for 12 years.

Eighty-two years since Simeon Toribio set his 2.00m personal best, the Philippine high jump record has improved by a mere 17cm. Nowadays, it is a rarity to see a Filipino athlete qualify for an outright Olympics slot, much less make it to the top eight. It is sad to note that in local collegiate- and national-level track & field meetings today, a 2.00m clearance is still deemed competitive.

Curing the ills of Philippine athletics will be a hard fought struggle. Let us remember – and honor – our past heroes, and draw inspiration from their world-beating feats.
Results:
Article by Joboy Quintos
References:

  1. Afable, Jorge (1972). “Philippine Sports Greats.”
  2. “Simeon Toribio.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simeon_Toribio. Retrieved 8-19-2012.
  3. Afable 1972.
  4. “Athletics at the 1932 Los Angeles Summer Games: Men’s High Jump.” http://www.sports-reference.com/olympics/summer/1932/ATH/mens-high-jump.html. Retrieved 8-19-2012.
  5. “Simeon Toribio.”
  6. “Athletics at the 1932 Los Angeles Summer Games: Men’s High Jump.”
  7. “Athletics at the 1932 Los Angeles Summer Games: Men’s High Jump.”
  8. “Athletics at the 1932 Los Angeles Summer Games: Men’s High Jump.”
  9. “Athletics at the 1932 Los Angeles Summer Games: Men’s High Jump.”
  10. Afable 1972.
  11. “Simeon Toribio.” http://www.sports-reference.com/olympics/athletes/to/simeon-toribio-1.html. Retrieved 8-19-2012.
  12. Afable 1972.
  13. Afable 1972.

Track Beauty of the Week: Olha Saladukha Ольга Саладуха

Olha Saladukha Ольга Саладуха is this week’s Track Beauty!

Saladukha is one of the world’s best triple jumpers. her first high caliber competition in the triple jump came in 1999, during the World Youth Championships, where Olha finished in 9th place with a 12.76m best mark. [1] She fared much better in the World Juniors three years later, improving four places to 5th in the final.

Click this link to read the full article…

10-for-10: Katherine Kay Santos

Despite the peaks and troughs of the Philippine athletics scene, Filipino women have competed with distinction in the long jump for more than two decades. Since Elma Muros-Posadas’ maiden long jump win in the 1989 edition of the Southeast Asian Games, the Philippines had fallen short of the title only once. The last Filipino to win an Asian Games medal was the evergreen Muros-Posadas in 1994. Marestella Torres emphatic win at the 2009 Asian Championships was the most high-profile achievement of a Filipino track & field in recent memory.

Photo from PATAFA/Roselyn Hamero

Katherine Kay Santos is poised to become the next best Filipino long jumper. The Baguio-based Santos is currently fifth in the Women’s Long Jump All-Time List (compiled by Andrew Pirie). She has a personal best of 6.25m, which she set en route to winning the 2011 Southeast Asian Games bronze medal. Illustrious names like Torres (6.71m), Muros-Posadas (6.56m), Lerma Bulauitan-Gabito (6.56m), and Lydia De Vega-Mercado (6.27m) are all ahead of Kat in the all-time list.

Santos is gifted with both raw flat out speed, having won several medals in national-level competition, and good jumping technique. The 22-year old is on the brink of barging into the big leagues. Although it’s a tad too early to say that she’s Torres’ heir apparent, the statistics show that the University of Baguio student is the Philippines’ second-best long jumper. Kat is actually a protege of Bulauitan-Gabito, herself a SEA Games gold medalist and an Olympian.

As she gains experience from regular exposure in the regional athletics circuit, it will only be a matter of time before Kat Santos makes her mark.

1. How did you get started with athletics?

When I was in 5th grade I wanted… to be part of the athletes in our school. But eventually the coach in our school hesitated to choose me. I didn’t know why [she did that]. But in [the] 6th grade I [pushed] myself to join [the] try outs.  I proved that I can be one of them [the varsity athletes] and [the coach eventually] chose me.

2. What’s the most memorable moment of your track career?

Most memorable? Of course the 2011 SEA Games in Indonesia. Maybe because it was my first time to compete in [the] SEA Games. [I had] mixed emotions.. (;  In my 1st attempt to jump I was really shaking. Suppeeeeer­rr. Hehe.

3. What’s your life-long dream?

To be an Olympian. ‘Diba? Sarap ng pakiramdam maging part man lang ng Olympics [It’s a great feeling to become part of the Olympics].

4. Name three other sports you’d love to do aside from athletics?

The 1st is synchronized swimming. I love watching it. [And also] sports climbing [and] sumo haha joke! The last is biking [cycling].

5. Who is your sporting idol?

My idol is DARYA KLISHINA. Ganda na [She’s beautiful], [a] model, and magaling pa [Darya excels] in our same event which is [the] long jump.

6. What do you when you are not on the track competing or training?

At home doing household chores, kulitan [playing] with my bunsong kapatid [youngest sibling] and my cousins na nakatira sa house namin [who live in our house], or sleep until noon… para makabawi sa pagod ng training [to recover from the exhaustion brought about by training].

7. What is your favorite pre-race pump-song?

Kahit ano lang [Anything]. Haha. Usually mga new ones na song [I usually listen to the new songs]… yung mga nauuso [the ones that are popular]! Gangnam Style. Haha lately yun!

8. Do you have a pre-competition ritual?

I just watch my diet mga [around] 2-3 weeks before the competition para magaan sa laro [so that I’ll feel light during the competition]. Kasi [Because] during preparation for such competition nagloload ako, so mabigat ako kapag sa [I bulk up in] training para makabuhat ng [to be able to lift the] target pounds pag nag weweigths training ako [in my training program].

9. Describe your dream vacation.

I want to be in a large and famous cruise ship and travel around the world. Astig diba? [Isn’t that cool?] (: Sarap mangarap, libre eh. [I love daydreaming. It’s free.]

10. Name three things you can’t live without.

Food! Water! Shelter! Siyempre [Of course, my] family ko. Daming money! And yung lifelong partner pag dumating na. I have no need for gadgets. (:

Isagani Peychär: An Austrian Athlete with Filipino Roots

Philippine sports, in particular, have benefited greatly from the Filipino diaspora. Filipino athletes with foreign roots like Cecil Mamiit, Miguel Molina, and the Younghusband brothers have competed with distinction for Flag and Country. The Philippine Basketball Association, despite a turbulent experience with the so-called Fil-Shams back in the nineties, has Filipino-Americans Filipino cagers as its biggest stars. Athletics has had its fair share of foreign-born stars in Ed Lasquete and Deborah Samson.

Track & field, being a fringe sport in the Philippines, has not seen the influx of high-profile stars as in the other, more lucrative sports. In light of the wide spectrum of Filipinos living across the globe, I’ve often wondered about those hidden talents.

I first learned about Isagani Peychär from an Austrian friend a few months back. Peychär is one of Austria’s top athletes in the long jump and the sprint hurdles. He was born to an Austrian father and a Filipina mother. The name “Isagani” is a uniquely Filipino name. It is actually a shortened version of the Tagalog phrase “Isang Masaganang Ani” (A Bountiful Harvest). [1]

The 31-year old has competed in high caliber major internationals like the European Indoor Championships, the European Cup (now the European Team Championships), [2] representing the landlocked Central European country. Isagani registered 7.35m in the long jump back in the 2005 Universiade in Izmir, good enough for 11th place in qualifying. He also finished 11th in qualifying at the European Indoor Championships in Madrid the same year, albeit with a more superior mark of 7.35m.

The Austrian-Filipino is the reigning Austrian indoor record holder in the long jump at 7.96m (2005, Munich). Isagani has an outdoor lifetime best of 7.94m (2005). Isagani is a well-rounded athlete who excels not just in the jumps, but in the sprints and hurdles as well. Peychär also holds the Austrian Youth 60m dash record (6.98s) and the Austrian Junior 110m Hurdles (0.99m) record (13.81s). [3] His personal bests are in the 60m, 100m, and the 110m Hurdles are respectable marks of 6.87s, 10.88s, and 14.52s, respectively.

Peychär is the same age – and only a few centimeters behind in terms of lifetime best – as Henry Dagmil, the Filipino long jump record holder at 7.99m.

The powerfully-built Isagani stands at just 1.70m, a height more common amongst Filipino males than in Austrians. As a sprint hurdler myself, I was particularly impressed with his hurdling. Smaller athletes are at a disadvantage in the sprint hurdles. The ideal hurdler usually stands between 1.78m (Allen Johnson) and 1.92 (Dayron Robles). To negotiate the sticks with Peychär’s Filipino stature requires much guts, desire, and speed – of which Isagani certainly was not lacking.

Running a 13-second sprint hurdle race is the mark of a world-class hurdler. I love the sprint hurdles so much that I get piqued everytime I’m reminded of the fact that no Filipino has gone below the 14-second barrier. If I’m not mistaken, Peychär is the only hurdler of Filipino descent who have achieved such a feat. Isagani is a product of the European system of athletics. Philippine track & field, in comparison, is grossly underdeveloped. This goes to show that with proper training and sufficient support, Filipino athletes could become world class again.

Additional Links:

Isagani’s Homepage

Isagani’s All-Athletics Profile

Isagani’s IAAF Biography

References:

  1. “What is the meaning of the name Isagani?.” (Answers, 2012). http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_meaning_of_the_name_Isagani. (16 September).
  2. “Erfolge.” (Homepage von Isagani Peychär, 2006). http://members.chello.at/isi-peychaer/ (16 September 2012).
  3. Ibid.

* Special thanks to Rosalie Tschann for bringing attention to Peychär’s achievements.

Track Beauty of the Week: Marije Smits

Marije Smits is this week’s Track Beauty!

In honor of the ongoing Paralympic Games in London, it is apt to select a talented, differently-abled athlete as Track Beauty.

Read: “The Paralympic Athletes” 

Smits is a long jumper and sprinter from the Netherlands. The 25-year old has extensive experience in international-level events. She made her debut in the Paralympics back in 2004.

Click this link to read the full article…

Barney Stinson… Olympic Long Jump Gold Medallist?

The resemblance between Barney Stinson (Neil Patrick Harris) and 2012 Olympic Long Jump Champion Greg Rutherford is… uncanny!

Click the screenshot to view the full image on 9gag:

Godspeed to Marestella Torres and Rene Herrera!

The Philippines will be sending two representatives to the Athletics competition in the London Olympics – long jumper Marestella Torres and steeplechaser Rene Herrera.

The 32-year old Torres is the national record holder for both the long jump (6.71m) and the triple jump (12.67m). She is a multiple Southeast Asian Games long jump  gold medalist. Upsetting the biggest names in regional long jumping, Marestella won the 2009 Asian Championships title in Guangzhou. The powerfully compact Torres is a veteran of numerous major international events, having competed in three editions of the World Championships  and three in the World Indoors. Her season’s best stands at 6.62m. Marestella is on her second Olympic team.

Read: “London Olympics Preview: The Long Jump”

Like Torres, Herrera is a multi-titled national athlete. He has won five Southeast Asian Games gold medals in the 3000m steeplechase, from 2003 to 2011. The 33-year old has made the final in two editions of the Asian Games, an event spiced with a multitude of African-born athletes. He has a personal best of 8:49.39. His best time in 2012 is 9:05.84, set while winning the National Championships in Dumaguete. Rene will make his Olympic debut in London.

Torres has what it takes to barge into the long jump final, but it’s going to be an uphill climb as she goes head-to-head against a multitude of 7-meter and near-7 meter jumpers. The rainy and soggy London weather might just level the playing field a bit.

The Philippines’ hopes in Olympic Athletics might not be at par with the world’s best, but this won’t keep me from cheering my compatriots. Godspeed to Marestella Torres and Rene Herrera!

Sources:

All-Athletics

IAAF

10-for-10: Danielle Frenkel דניאל פרנקל talks about late starts and breaking records

Danielle Frenkel דניאל פרנקל answers the 10-for-10 quiz!

Frenkel is Israel’s top high jumper. Originally training to be a professional dancer in her teenage days, the Israeli gradually made the big shift to athletics. Her breakout year came in 2010, as she padded her lifetime best by 11 centimeters. En route to rewriting the Israeli national records (1.91m), Danielle also won her first ever national title.

Read: “Track Beauty of the Week – Danielle Frenkel דניאל פרנקל “

Danielle with her 2011 Israeli “Female Athlete of the Year” trophy. (Photo from Assaf Yekuel)

At the 2010 European Championships in Barcelona, Frenkel leaped 1.92m in qualifying, but finished in 12th place at the final. She fared much better at the European Indoor Championships the next year, jumping over 1.94m (new Israeli indoor record) in qualifying. Danielle placed a hard fought fourth (1.92m) in the final.

Click this link to visit and like Danielle’s Facebook page

A knee injury had temporarily put Frenkel’s high jumping aspirations on hold. After undergoing surgery early in 2012, Danielle is on the fast track to full recovery – and to greater heights.

1.) How did you get started with athletics?

At school, I have always stood out [in] sports. My first high jump competition was in a district meet when I was 14 and [I]won 1st place . My coach today [Anatoliy Shafran] spotted me and told me I am very talented, and with practice I can jump higher. Back then, dancing had a greater appeal to me.

Only 5 years later, a phone call from my coach who offered me to participate in a meet, and the following Israeli championships, where I took 3rd place, made me realize that high jumping is my real passion.

2.) What’s the most memorable moment of your athletics career?

The most memorable moment was in Israel’s 2010 championships. When I broke the Israeli record by 3 cm and became the first Israeli woman who ever jumped over 1.90. I felt so good that I finally proved my real potential.

3.) What is your life long dream?

My long dream is to reach my full potential, and I feel I have a long way to go.

4.) Let’s lighten up a bit! What would you rather wear and why? Short shorts or tights?

Short shorts for sure.

5.) What is your favorite sports movie?

Berlin 36.

6.) What’s the best pump-up song of all-time?

Black eyed-peas : Pump it.

7.) If you could spend the rest of your days at any place in the world, which would you choose?

I traveled for 4 months in central America and saw some amazing places. My answer would be any place, as long as I have my loved ones with me.

8.) What do you do in your free time?

Now I study for law and business degree. But I live very close to the beach. I like to go there and relax with friends.

9.) Name three things you just can’t live without:

My family and my boyfriend, chocolates, and [taking a ]bath.

10.) What advice would you give to the young athletes of today?

Be patient, explore all kinds of sports until you find the one that fits you and you love the most. I was a volleyball player and a ballet dancer. Only at the age of nineteen I realised that high jump is my destiny.

Sources:

Danielle’s Wikipedia profile

IAAF biography

Additional Links:

Danielle’s Facebook Page

All-Athletics Profile

“London Olympics Preview: The Long Jump” by Joboy Quintos

The long jump is one of the most exciting discipline in athletics. The London Olympics will feature a good mix of upcoming and current athletes, going head-to-head for a memorable competition.

Photo from Nigel Chadwick

Women’s Long Jump

Brittney Reese (7.12m SB outdoors, 7.23m SB indoors) has dominated the women’s long jumping scene the past few years. Reese made her international debut at the Osaka World Championships in 2007, where she placed eighth in the final, as the Russian troika of Tatyana Lebedeva (Татьяна Лебедева), Lyudmila Kolchanova (Людмила Колчанова), and Tatyana Kotova (Татьяна Котова) made a clean sweep of the medals. Since then, the unorthodox former basketball player had won two World titles (2009 and 2011) and two World indoor crowns (2010 and 2012).

Reese at the 2010 World Indoor Championships. (Photo from Erik van Leeuwen)

Although the American has shown chinks in her armor in some long jump competitions, Reese has displayed nerves of steel in the championships that count the most. Only an Olympic medal eludes her collection. The rest of the long jump field will be hard-pressed to top a motivated, healthy and techinically-proficient Brittney Reese.

This is hard for me to say, considering that I’m a big fan of Darya Klishina Дарья Клишина: The American is poised to win the Olympic long jump title.

But then again, Reese had shown erratic jumping in the past. She could be beaten in a major championship. The in-form Russian, Olga Kucherenko Ольга Кучеренко (7.03m SB outdoors, 6.91m SB indoors); the defending Olympic champion, Maurren Higa Maggi (6.85m SB); and the prolific Darya, are at the vanguard of Reese’s challengers.

   

Klishina (L), Kucherenko (C), and Maggi (R). (Photos from Erik van Leeuwen, sport-vlg.ru, and Agência Brazil/Janine Moraes)

Kucherenko, who has a personal best of 7.13m from 2010 and the silver medalist from Daegu, has displayed sterling form this year. Reese, Anna Nazarova (7.11m), Chelsea Hayes (7.10m), Nastassia Mironchyk – Ivanova (7.08m), Kucherenko, Janay DeLoach and Veronika Shutkova have all gone beyond 7 meters this season. Brazil’s Maggi has experienced a resurgence the past two years. A 7.26m jumper at her best, The 36-year old Maggi had gone tantalizingly close to 7 meters in 2011.

Note: Klishina and Kucherenko did not make the Russian Olympic Team.

These athletes are in the running for a spot on the podium.

Sostene Moguenara (6.88m SB outdoors) and Shara Proctor (6.84m SB outdoors, 6.89 SB/PB indoors) have also displayed excellent form in 2012.

Although slowed down by an ankle injury last season, the 21-year old Klishina has the makings of a future champion. The 2011 European Indoor champion has an outdoor personal best of 7.05m from 2010. Darya is the second-best junior long jumper of all-time, behind the great Heike Drechsler. A healthy Klishina could foil Reese’s Olympic dreams.

But then again, Klishina and Kucherenko were not selected to the Russian Olympic Team, as they finished below the top three at their Olympic Trials. The Russian squad possess such depth that they can make do without a talented junior and an in-form athlete.

A total of eight jumpers have gone beyond 7 meters this season. Reese is my top choice for Olympic gold, with Nazarova and Mironcyk-Ivanova for silver and bronze, respectively.

Top Three Predictions

Gold: Brittney Reese

Silver: Darya Klishina Anna Nazarova

Bronze:  Olga Kucherenko Nastassia Mironchyk – Ivanova

Men’s Long Jump

If Dwight Phillips (8.74m PB), the 2004 Athens Olympic Champion and four-time World champion, did not figure in a car accident last May, he’ll be the favorite for the Olympic title. But then again, misfortune had plagued the long jump legend’s 2012 preparations.

C’mon Dwight! Time to go on Wolverine mode! (Photo from Erik van Leeuwen)

Hence, the field is wide open for a flurry of names to rise to the occasion. The farthest jump this season is just a relatively humble 8.35m by the host country’s Greg Rutherford and Russian junior Sergey Morgunov, who rewrote the World junior record. Sebastian Bayer and Marquise Goodwin have respective season’s bests of 8.34m and 8.33m. A mere four centimeters separate the next six athletes in the 2012 rankings: Godfrey Khotso Mokoena (8.29m A), Mitchell Watt (8.28m), Henry Frayne (8.27m), Christian Reif (8.26m), Will Claye (8.25m), Jinzhe Li (8.25m), and Aleksandr Menkov Александр Меньков (8.24m.

The newly-crowned World Indoor champion, Mauro Vinicius da Silva of Brazil, has a season’s best of 8.10m.

 

Mokoena (L) and Watt (R). (Photos from Petritap and Erik van Leeuwen)

The contenders, save for the 34-year old Phillips, are a young bunch. The oldest is the 27-year old Reif, the 2010 European Champion. Will Claye, attempting the triple/long jump double is the youngest at 21-years old.

If the clock runs out for the recuperating Phillips, the battle for long jump gold will be two-pronged. Mokoena, the 2008 Olympic silver medallist, has the most considerable experience and the farthest lifetime best at 8.50m. Reif (8.47m PB) and Watt (8.45m PB) round up the next two.

   

Claye (L), Rutherford (C), and Reif (R). (Photos from Erik van Leeuwen and Eckhard Pecher/Arcimboldo)

Bayer has an indoor personal best of 8.71m from 2009. Although he had won the 2012 European title with his 8.34m leap, the European indoor record holder has been unable to replicate such high-quality jumping in major championships. Should Bayer get his act together, he could finally live up to his huge potential. Then there’s the young Russian Morgunov, who leaped to new World Junior Record of 8.35m. Should he be able to display the same level of consistency, he could figure in the top three.

Phillips is my sentimental favorite to win the long jump gold. Had he not been injured, he would have been a strong contender for the top spot.

Mokoena is the next best choice for top honors because of his edge in championship experience. The exuberant Claye could figure in a tight battle  bronze (or even silver). Rutherford, who has jumped personal bests of 8.35m twice this year, is another contender for a spot on the podium. The in-form Briton might just pull-off a Jai Taurima, albeit with none of the “cigarettes, pizza, and late nights.”

These jumpers certainly are capable of leaping beyond the humble season’s best of 8.35m. The prospects for the Men’s Long Jump competition are indeed exciting due to its unpredictability.

Top Three Predictions

Gold: Mitchell Watt/Godfrey Khotso Mokoena

Silver: Greg Rutherford/Sebastian Bayer

Bronze:  Will Claye/Christian Reif

Article by Joboy Quintos

Sources:

2008 Beijing Olympics Results

2011 World Championships Results

2009 World Championships Results

2007 World Championships Results

2012 World Indoor Championships Results

2010 World Indoor Championships Results

IAAF Top List – 2012 Men’s Long Jump

IAAF Top List – 2012 Women’s Long Jump

Henry Dagmil takes the 10-for-10 Quiz

Henry Dagmil first came to national prominence at the 2004 Philippine National Open. The Mapua Institute of Technology alumnus, then 22 years old, eclipsed the long-standing record of 1936 Berlin Olympian Nino Ramirez. Dagmil flew to a distance of 7.83m in the long jump, beating the 68-year old record by 18 centimeters.

Dagmil at the 2012 Philippine National Games. (Photo by Ed Karell Gamboa/Pinoymiler/Moriel Carreon)

Since that definitive moment, Dagmil has been the Philippines top male long jumper, complementing Marestella Torres’ sterling record in the women’s event. He has competed at the world’s highest stage, representing the country at the Berlin and Daegu World Championships and at the Beijing Olympics.

Click here to view Henry’s photos with Darya Klishina

Dagmil has amassed an impressive collection of regional-level medals. In an international career spanning almost one decade, the Filipino champion had won two Southeast Asian Games long jump titles (2005, 2007), on top of silver (2011) and bronze (2009) medals. In front of hometown fans at the 2005 Manila SEA Games, Dagmil teamed up with the 100m/200m national record holder Ralph Soguilon, Arnold Villarube and Albert Salcedo, to win a 4x100m relay silver, setting a new national mark in the process.

Click here to read more articles about Henry Dagmil on Pinoymiler

Video from Jad Adrian

The two-time SEA Games long jump champion has a lifetime’s best of 7.99m from 2008.  However, the eight meter barrier – the mark of a truly world-class long jumper – has continued to elude Dagmil by the smallest of margins. Now 31-years old, Dagmil has until the 8th of July to go beyond the 8.10m Olympic “B” standard – and secure a ticket to London.

Dagmil has the knack for the unexpected. Prior to his record-breaking feat in 2004, he was actually left out of the national team because of injury. “When others might give up he let that catalyst make him stronger,” said Andrew Pirie, the Ernie Baron of Philippine athletics and Dagmil’s close friend.   “[Dagmil] came back in 2004 to wipe out the 68 year old national record in the long jump.”

1.) How did you get started with athletics?

[In] Grade4, I started [competing in the] 50m and long jump. I was 10 years old.

2.) What’s the most memorable moment of your athletics career?

The most memorable is [when] I  represented [the Philippines at the] Olympic Games.

3.) What is your life long dream?

To be successful in life, jump [beyond the] eight-meter barrier. And to be a national coach [who can] produce a world class athlete.

4.) Let’s lighten up a bit! What would you rather wear and why? Short shorts or tights?

I like Mizuno. [It looks] good on me. I prefer tights.

5.) What is your favorite sports movie?

Sports movie? Yung mga nagbibigay inpirasyon. Kahit anong movie basta maluluha ako. hehehe [I like inspiring movies. Any kind of film that makes me cry].

6.) What’s the best pump-up song of all-time?

Kahit anong song basta inspiring [Any song. As long as it’s inspiring].

7.) If you could spend the rest of your days at any place in the world, which place would you choose?

I’ll spend my time with [my] wife and my kids, because I’ve spent [half of my life] on my athletic career.

8.) What do you do in your free time?

Rest, sleep, watch a movie, call my wife [and] my son on the phone, [and surfing the] net.

9.) Name three things you just can’t live without:

Money, phone, and laptop.

10.) What advice would you give to the young athletes of today?

I want them [to] dream. Ask the Lord’s [help], to be patient and willing to sacrifice [a] normal life to become an Olympian.  [Not to] be a fool even [if] you [achieve the dream of being an] Olympian.

Additional Links:

IAAF biography

All-Athletics profile

London Olympics Preview: The Triple Jump

The triple jump features contenders from both ends of the age spectrum. Established stars will be pitted against young and equally talented upstarts. The event will also feature Britain’s top hopes for Olympic glory.

Photo from Nigel Chadwick

Women’s Triple Jump

The composition of the podium in 2012 will be a lot different from that four years ago. The old guard had passed the baton to the new.

The top contenders for the Olympic title feature three athletes. Cuba’s Yargelis Savigne, twice World champion, holds the most experience. Then there’s Olga Rypakova Ольга Сергеевна Рыпакова, the Asian record holder and the 2010 World indoor champion. Ukraine’s Olha Saladuha (Ольга Саладуха), as the reigning World champion from Daegu, has the momentum and psychological advantage of being the current outdoor titlist.

   

Rypakova (L), Savigne (C), and Saladuha (R). (Photos from Erik van Leeuwen)

Colombia’s Caterine Ibargüen streaked to a world-leading mark of 14.95m last April, albeit at altitude. Yamilé Aldama, the 39-year old Cuban-born Briton, is the oldest amongst the field and is the most experienced.

Aldama (15.29m, 2003), Savigne (15.28m, 2007), and Rypakova (15.25m, 2010) are all members of the elite 15 meter club – and are perched high up the all-time list. Ibarguen (14.99A, 2011) and Saladuha (14.98m, 2011) are mere centimeters from breaking the coveted barrier.

Taking into account the recency and quality of personal bests, Ibarguen heads the cast. But then again, she has limited experience in the world’s highest stage. Considering the depth of the field, seeing multiple athletes go beyond 15 meters seem plausible. It’s one thing to perform well at a minor competition, and another to display excellence at the summit of sport. The resurgent Aldama, fresh from winning the World indoor title in Istanbul, might not possess the spring in her legs to compete head-to-head with an in-form Savigne, Rypakova and Saladuha.

Saladuha (14.75m) holds a small, 2cm lead over Rypakova (14.73m) in the 2012 top list. Savigne (14.35m), however, is not even in the top five this year. Despite her advanced age, Aldama (14.65m), might still have a few tricks under her sleeve.

With these facts in mind, Rypakova is my bet to win Olympic gold. The Kazakh is capable of making big jumps, and had done so at a considerably recent time (Doha World Indoors). Once she gets her rhythm going, Rypakova could triumph over the classy field.

Top Three Predictions

Gold: Olga Rypakova

Silver: Yargelis Savinge/Olga Saladuha

Bronze:  Olga Saladuha/Yamilé Aldama

Men’s Triple Jump

The 34-year old Phillips Idowu, the 2008 Beijing Olympics silver medalist, would be pitted against the young troika of Teddy Tamgho, Christian Taylor, and Will Claye. Tamgho, the World indoor record holder, is high up the outdoor all-time list with a best mark of 17.98m. Christian Taylor is two centimeters behind the Frenchman, with his 17.96m best from Daegu last year. Idowu’s lifetime best of 17.81m, however, is superior to Claye’s 17.50m. But then again, the other half of the American triple jumping duo had hopped, stepped and skipped 17.70m this year, en route to winning the World Indoor title in Istanbul.

Note: Tamgho has ended his 2012 season – and his Olympic campaign – due to an ankle injury.

   

Idowu (L), Taylor (C), and Claye (R). (Photos from Erik van Leeuwen)

The other contenders for a spot on the podium are the Cuban trio of Alexis Copello, Arnie David Giralt, and Yoandri Betanzos. The defending Olympic champion, Portugal’s Nelson Évora, has discovered some semblance of his old form, as he placed fifth (17.35m) in Daegu.

Taylor is the 2012 world leader with 17.62m from the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene. Russia’s Lyukman Adams Люкман Адамс (17.53m)and Cuba’s Osviel Hernández (17.49m) round up the next two spots, followed by Claye (17.48m). Idowu has a season’s best of 17.31m.

Idowu is my pick for the triple jump gold, due to the considerable depth of his experience. He is in peak form and has shown marked consistency. The 2009 World champion grew up in Hackney, one of the host boroughs of the London Olympics. To compete in one’s own backyard could give Idowu the decisive boost to complete the only major title missing from his collection.

The competition has the makings of a classic, with two near-18 meter jumpers figuring in the clash. Tamgho, however, had just emerged from a six-month lay-off after reportedly brawling with a female athlete. It remains to be seen how this incident has affected the Frenchman’s focus and preparations. Taylor and Claye, are relatively new at the international championship level. But then again, their youthful zest – and considerably impressive stat sheet (especially Taylor’s) – are potent combinations.

Top Three Predictions

Gold: Phillips Idowu

Silver: Christian Taylor

Bronze: Will Claye/Teddy Tamgho

Sources:

2008 Beijing Olympics Results

2011 World Championships Results

2009 World Championships Results

2007 World Championships Results

2012 World Indoor Championships Results

2010 World Indoor Championships Results

Track Beauty of the Week: Anna Chicherova Анна Владимировна Чичерова

Anna Chicherova Анна Владимировна Чичерова is this week’s track beauty!

Chicherova is amongst the very best of Russia’s impressive array of high jumpers. She first came into international prominence in 2003, when she first cleared 2.00m in Moscow, seven days shy of her twenty-first birthday. Two days after turning twenty-one, the talented Russian again sailed over 2.00m, in a strong gesture that the first instance wasn’t a fluke!

   

Photos from Sporting Heroes and Peoples.ru

The Russian missed out on a first-ever major international medal at the 2005 Helsinki World Championships, where she placed fourth. After a forgettable 2006 season, Chicherova has been on a steady climb to the top echelons of the discipline since winning double World Championship silver medals (Osaka and Berlin) and an Olympic bronze medal in Beijing.

Chicherova missed the 2010 season following the birth of her first child. She came back with a bang in 2011, despite juggling her commitments on the track and raising a newborn daughter.

Read: “Russia’s Anna Chicherova gives Chaunté Lowe a lesson to ponder”

At the Russian Championships this year, Chicherova sent a strong message to defending World Champion Blanka Vlasic as the former notched an impressive personal best of 2.07m (ninth in the all-time list). The Russian, with her remarkable post-maternal comeback is now the fourth-best high jumper of all-time.

With Vlasic seemingly in a slump (she has a 2011 season’s best of 2.00m, relatively low by her standards), Chicherova has a golden opportunity in Daegu to finally snag that elusive crown.

POC-PSC National Games Athletics Wrap-up (23-26 May 2011)

The annual Philippine National Open Invitational Athletics Championships was held in Bacolod, Negros Occidental; as part of the Olympic-style program of the POC-PSC National Games. The newly-renovated track of the Panaad Stadium, site of many an Azkals game, was the scene of battle. The event was an opportunity for aspiring elite athletes to showcase their talents. An amalgam of crack international campaigners, collegiate standouts, as well as promising grassroots talents comprised the lineup of athletes.

Aside from a few snags in the processing of the official ID cards, the athletics competition was fairly well-run. The technical officials, composed of both Manila-based and provincial personnel, were a well-drilled lot. The green-clad PSC volunteers, despite their inexperience, were exuberant in the way they did their jobs.

Panaad at Night (Photo from Zek Valera)

There were some instances when the start of a race was pushed back because of equipment breakdown, particularly with the automatic timing system. Nevertheless, it was a relatively well-organized local competition, according to a foreign coach.

The Sprints and Hurdles

In light of the oft-revised schedule, only a handful of foreign entries from Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia made it to Bacolod. The most illustrious name among the visitors was Rayzam Shah Wan Sofian, the 2007 SEA Games gold medalist in the 110m high hurdles. The Malaysian did not disappoint, as he outclassed a lean local sprint hurdles field, stopping the clock in 14.1s. Laguna’s Robin Tuliao was a far second at 14.8s. Kota Kinobalu’s prolific Eddie Edward won over many-time UAAP seniors champion Romnick Herida of UAAP Athletics (11.19s), compatriot Fahrul Nazri (11.32s) and Australia-based Andrew Pirie of the Philippine Pole Vault Club (11.34s) in the century dash.

Patrick Unso of TMS Ship-DLSU reigned supreme in both the junior 110m high hurdles (14.3s) and the 400m low hurdles (54.47s). Robert Francisco of Laguna (14.5s) came second to Unso in the boy’s sprint hurdles.

There was some controversy in the men’s hurdles races, as national team member Junrey Bano was disqualified moments before participating in the 400m low hurdles qualifying. Nevertheless, Bano was allowed to take part, in spite of being officially out of the competition. The country’s top low hurdler stopped the clock at a classy 52.80s. UAAP Athletics’ Jeson Ramil Cid officially won the event in 54.60s.

Isidro del Prado, Jr., whose illustrious father still holds the Philippine 400m national record, surprisingly false started in qualifying, meriting an instant disqualification for the talented quarter-miler. In the absence of Del Prado, 2007 SEA Games gold medalist Julius Nierras (48.55s) and 20-year old Christian Bagsit (49.03s) made it a one-two finish for the Philippine Air Force. Del Prado (22.05s) nipped Nierras in the half-lap, beating the veteran by a massive four-hundredths of a second. Zamboanga’s Noli Torres (50.79s) and Aldrin Gonzales (51.36s) ruled the boy’s 400m dash.

13-year old Mary Diesto, a student of nearby Bacolod Tay Tung High School, won the girls’ 100m dash with an impressive 13.20sc clocking. Filipino-American Princess Joy Griffey walloped FEU’s Hanelyn Loquinto in the 200m dash, 25.24s to 26.03s, despite being weakened by food poisoning.

National training pool member Zara dela Virgo, slowed down by a knee injury sustained at the recently-concluded Thailand Open, failed to finish the Women’s 100m hurdles. Jennylyn Progio ruled the poorly-attended two-woman final, stopping the clock in 15.8s. Nerve pain saw the withdrawal of national record holder Sheena Atilano from the sprint hurdles field. Capiz’ Jaycel Cabaguena (15.9s) was impressive in the girls’ race, romping to a commanding 1.3s gap over TMS Ship’s Lea Casilihan (16.6s).

FEU’s Josie Malacad (1:02.79s) edged out Laguna’s Keizel Pedrina in the one-lap hurdles race. Malacad won over her UST rival by almost two-seconds.

The Distance Events

The country’s long distance aces, Rene Herrera and Eduardo Buenavista were virtually untouchable in their respective events. Herrera (9:06), a many-time SEA Games champion, completely demolished UAAP Athletics’ Christopher Ulboc (9:18.22) in the 3,000m steeplechase. Similarly, Buenavista ran a punishing last lap to reign supreme in the 10,000m run.

Vertek in action at the 10,000m run (Photo from Zek Valera)

San Sebastian’s Mervin Guarte set a new national junior record in the 1,500m run, en route to winning the senior title. Guarte ran below 4:00 in the metric mile, notching a fine time of 3:57.83.

The Relays

 The United Track & Field Team, composed of Diesto, Shaira Hernandez, Raye Deanne Ferrer and Hannah Malate – all 13 year old’s from Bacolod Tay Tung – eked out a surprise win in the girls’ 4x100m relay. The Capiz team, the pre-race favorites, false started; hence, meriting instant disqualification.

The Men’s 4x100m relay proved exciting, as a fast-finishing Rayzam Shah of Kota Kinabalu almost ran down the locals on the home straight. The UAAP Athletics quartet of Jhon Rey Bardos, Abraham Alzona, Herida and Cid – a powerhouse lineup of UAAP foes – won first place in 42.05s. The PAF team, anchored by Bagsit, came in second place at 42.07s, three-hundredths of a second from the Malaysian team.

PAF’s Bagsit in the 4x400m relay (Photo from Zek Valera)

The Philippine Air Force foursome of Nierras, Eduardo Alejan, Christopher Demata and Bagsit proved too much for the fancied UAAP squad. The Ernie Candelario-trained Airmen built up an insurmountable 5 second lead, stopping the clock in 3:14.42.

The Decathlon and the Field Events

The indefatigable Cid, the national junior record holder, scored 6,287 points in the Men’s Decathlon, propped up by dominating performances in the 110m high hurdles, 400m dash and the 1,500m run. National training pool member Manuel Lasangue was a far second with 5,670 points.

National team stalwarts Arniel Ferrera and Rosie Villarito each grabbed double golds, with the former taking titles in his best event, the hammer throw (57.55m), and the discus throw (43.23m). Villarito, competing for Laguna, won both the women’s shot put and javelin throw.

Despite being six meters off his personal best, national record holder Danilo Fresnido (64.20m) easily won over SEA Games medalist Dandy Gallenero (61.40m). Baguio-based Eleazer Sunang almost broke the long-standing shot put national record, heaving the implement to a distance of 15.57m. In frustration, the burly Sunang threw the shot from a standing position after the competition, easily reaching 16.00m!

Negros Occidental’s Maika de Oro handily won the Girls’ Discus Throw with her 37.36m heave. The hometown bet also struck gold in the shot up with her 10.18m throw.

Jerome Margallo of Team Hua Liong topped the Men’s Pole Vault. The national pool member cleared 4.25m, way off his 4.64m best, but more than enough to edge out Laguna’s Robin Bunda, the ageless Emerson Obiena and UAAP Athletics’ Zek Valera. Bunda, Obiena and Valera all cleared 4.15m. On the distaff side, Riezel Buenaventura – another Obiena protege – was virtually unopposed. The FEU alumna flew to a new personal best of 3.81m. TMS Ships’ Alex Smith, the national junior record holder, was a far second at 2.70m.

The come-backing Benigno Marayag narrowly lost to Nino Espinosa of Laguna in the Men’s long jump. Both jumpers had best jumps of 7.21m, but the latter won over the triple jump specialist on count-back.

Baguio’s Catherine Kay Bautista twice finished second behind Marestella Torres. Torres, the national record holder for both the long jump and the triple jump, was in a class of her own, notching winning leaps of 6.38m and 12.55m. The exuberant Bautista leaped 6.09m and 12.09m, on top of winning the 100m dash (12.58s) over national training pool member Loquinto. Bautista, who is coached by former jumps queen Lerma Baluaitan-Gabito, is a sure cinch to be bumped up to the training pool, in light of her performance in the horizontal jumps.

Additional links:

View the complete athletics results from the PSC website

Videos:

From the UAAP Athletics Facebook page

Fr0m the PATAFA Facebook page

Pictures:

From the PSC Facebook page

Track Beauty of the Week: Yuliya Pidluzhnaya Юлия Витальевна Пидлужная

Yuliya Pidluzhnaya Юлия Витальевна Пидлужная is this week’s track beauty!

Pidluzhnaya burst into the senior scene with her bronze medal at the European Indoor Championships in France. The Russian long jumper, made it a 1-3 punch for the athletics powerhouse nation, leaping 6.75m in the final.

Read: Yuliya Pidluzhnaya Answers the 10-for-10 Quiz

   

Photos from Getty Images and RusAthletics.com

The 22-year old also placed 3rd at the European Junior Championships back in 2007. A year later, she finished 8th in qualifying at the World Junior Championships in Beijing. Pidluzhnaya has an outdoor personal best of 6.84m set in 2010 – a world class mark in women’s long jumping. ith her podium finish in Paris, Pidluzhnaya had solidified her spot among the long list of elite Russian long jumpers.

Yuliya won silver at the 2011 World University Games in Shenzen, China. Her best leap of 6.56m was good enough for second place behind compatriot Anna Nazarova. Her 2012 start wasn’t as impressive as the previous year. To date, the Russian has an indoor best of 6.60m. Pidluzhnaya, however, could only muster a modest 6.28m mark at the Russian National team championships in Sochi, the first major Russian outdoor meeting this year.

Additional link:

All-Athletics Profile

Track Beauty of the Week: Danielle Frenkel דניאל פרנקל

Danielle Frenkel דניאל פרנקל is this week’s Track Beauty!

The Israeli high jumper’s first love is dancing. But to her coach, her talent in athletics had always beckoned. According to an EAA article, Frenkel was “on the verge of becoming a professional dancer” five years ago. Anatoliy Shafran, Frenkel’s trainer, convinced her to give the sport a second try. Frenkel, with her solid dancing background, reminds me of another dancing high jumper – Blanka Vlasic!

Photos from nrg.co.il and haaretz.com

The Israeli’s improvement started gradually at first, with Frenkel clearing 1.69m and 1.75m in 2007 and 2008. During the 2010 European Championships in Barcelona, Frenkel set a new national record, clearing 1.92m in qualifying.

However, pressure hindered Frenkel from replicating her stellar form in the final. As a result, she finished a dismal 12th, with her 1.85m mark.

The 23-year old made amends at the European Indoor Championships in Paris, narrowly missing an historic medal for Israel. Nevertheless, she went over 1.92m in her first attempt, before leaping over 1.94m to clinch fourth place. Frenkel could not sustain her fine form in the rest of the 2011 season. She could only muster clearances of 1.75m and 1.85m at the Universiade and the World Championships, respectively.

Photos from Danielle Frenkel’s Facebook page

Frenkel, unfortunately, succumbed to a knee injury. She went under the knife to repair a torn ligament at the start of 2012. With her reputation on the rise after respectable performances in 2010 and 2011, the talented Israeli is certainly bound for bigger things, as soon as she fully recovers ftom injury.

Source:

EAA

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