Tag Archives: 史冬鹏

Liu Xiang (刘翔) wins 3rd Asiad Gold!!!

Liu Xiang 刘 翔 stamped his class in a badly outgunned field, stopping the clock at 13.09s. Shi Dong Peng 史冬鹏 placed 2nd with a 13.39s performance, making it a 1-2 finish for the host country. South Korea’s Park Tae-Kyong 박태경 won Bronze.

When I watched the Youtube clip above and saw my idol romp to his best performance in years, I was ecstatic. Seeing Liu celebrate at the finish line is a priceless moment for this hardcore Liu Xiang fan. I raised my arms in triumph, rejoicing with the billion strong Chinese people! All of a sudden, the bad memories of Beijing 2008 are but a distant memory. Even though I watched the race from a measly streaming site, I could almost feel the electricity of Guangzhou’s Aoti Stadium as the thousands of spectators cheered wildly!

Whilst watching the slow motion replay of the race, one can feel the raw intensity of Liu. After all, the Asian Games is the biggest athletics event in China since the 2008 Olympics. The fact that Liu grazed a few hurdles with his hamstring is a testament to this momentous race.

Read the IAAF article here

Read the Universal Sports article here

Read the Yahoo Sports article here

Photos from Daylife.com and Getty Images

Liu’s 13.09s is his best time since the 2007 season. The 2004 Olympic Champion dramatically lowered his erstwhile 2010 seasons’ best of 13.40s.

Results from gz2010.cn

I love how Liu jumped to the top of the podium during the medal ceremony. It was reminiscent of his historic 2004 Athens Olympic gold!

Liu Xiang is indeed back! Dayron Robles and David Oliver – watch out!

Liu’s guts pose! (Photo from Zimbio/Getty Images)

Video credits:

wwcast

sasalove2a2

Additional link:

More photos

Liu Xiang (刘翔) is back!

The 27-year old former world record holder breezed through the heats of the 2010 Guangzhou Asian Games, posting the fastest qualifying time (13.48s) in a modest field. Liu Xiang’s mid-13 second clocking, whilst highly competitive in Asian hurdling circles, is a far cry from Liu’s most stellar performances. Watching the clip of the race, it seems as if my idol was a tad bit less explosive.

Photo from chinadaily.com.cn and Xinhua

Korea’s Park Tae-Kyong, 3rd at the 2002 Asian Games, finished a distant second to Liu in the 1st heat (13.68s). 21-year old Chamras Rittedet of Thailand, the SEA Games Champion, stopped the clock at 13.82 – new personal best.

Results from gz2010.cn

It was a much better race than two of Liu’s most recent races in the 2010 World Indoor Championships and a Diamond League meet in Shanghai.

I’m quite stumped at Shi Dong Peng’s (史冬鹏) sub-par performance in the 2nd heat (13.82s). The past two years should have been Big Shi’s time to shine, in light of Liu’s injury. But the second-best Chinese hurdler never seemed to have retained his razor-sharp form in 2007, where Shi ran to a PB of 13.19s.

Read the Chinadaily article here

As Liu cleared the first few hurdles, shadows of his once potent self unraveled. The smooth hurdle clearances with his swooping lead arm, the snappy short-long-short three stride pattern was vintage Liu Xiang. Although the Chinese icon slowed down as he neared the tape, gone was the reluctance so evident in his injury-marred races of yesterday.

Read Liu Xiang and the Asian Games

In light of the relatively weak competition, Liu is a sure cinch to bag his third successive sprint hurdling crown in this Wednesday’s final – a significant albeit modest step towards London 2012!

Here’s my fearless forecast for the 110m high hurdles final: (1) Liu Xiang of course! (2) Chamras Rittedet and (3) Park Tae-Kyong or Shi Dong Peng.

Video credit

cctv7military

Additional link:

More Liu Xiang photos

110m High Hurdles: 2003 Paris and 2005 Helsinki World Championships

Whilst writing previous Liu Xiang post, I stumbled upon clips of Liu Xiang’s bronze medal in the 2003 Paris World Championships and his silver medal in Helsinki World Champs, two years later. This is the first time I’ve seen actual footage of the two races!

2003 Paris World Champs:

This was Liu Xiang’s first-ever major championship medal and Allen Johnson’s last world outdoor title. Liu was just 20-years old, but still managed to finish third (13.27s) behind the more illustrious American duo of Johnson (13.12s) and the 2000 Sydney Olympics silver medalist, Terrence Trammell (13.20s).

19-year old Shi Dong Peng 史冬鹏 (13.55s), fresh out of a silver medal in the 2002 World Junior Championships in Kingston, also qualified for his first major senior final.

Results (from sporting-heroes.com):

  1. Allen JOHNSON (USA) 13.12
  2. Terrence TRAMMELL (USA) 13.20
  3. Xiang LIU (CHN) 13.23
  4. Larry WADE (USA) 13.34
  5. Chris PHILLIPS (USA) 13.36
  6. Marcio Simao DE SOUZA (BRA) 13.48
  7. Dongpeng SHI (CHN) 13.55
  8. Yoel HERNANDEZ (CUB) 13.57

2005 Helsinki World Champs:

Liu (13.08), the newly-crowned Olympic champion and then co-world record holder, was upset by the audacious Ladji Doucoure (13.07s) of France. The 19-year old Frenchman came out of a disappointing Olympic campaign, badly hitting one of the barriers in the final. Allen Johnson, the defending world champion, clung on to a quick 13.10s.

The Helsinki World Champs announced the coming of age of the new generation of sprint hurdlers. It’s unfortunate that Doucoure has been slowed down by a spate of injuries in the subsequent years.

Results (from sporting-heroes.com):

  1. Ladji DOUCOURE (FRA) 13.07
  2. Xiang LIU (CHN) 13.08
  3. Allen JOHNSON (USA) 13.10
  4. Dominique ARNOLD (USA) 13.13
  5. Terrence TRAMMELL (USA) 13.20
  6. Joel BROWN (USA) 13.47
  7. Maurice WIGNALL (JAM) 13.47
  8. Mateus FACHO INOCENCIO (BRA) 13.48

It feels great to actually see the two races. Being a student of the sport living at the age of Web 2.0 surely has its advantages!

Video credits:

jiaimefprod

azfeet22

Liu Xiang (刘翔) and the Asian Games

Since it’s Asian Games time again, I couldn’t help but watch  Liu Xiang’s 刘翔 gold medal-winning performances in Busan and Doha.  The 2002 Busan race was memorable. I was just starting out with the sport. I became an instant Liu Xiang fan once I saw him race! I even recorded the event on VHS; hence the grainy format.

Read my “Sidekicks” post on Liu Xiang

2002 Busan Asian Games – 110m High Hurdles (from Todor Krastev):

  1. Liu Xiang 刘翔 (CHN) – 13.27s
  2. Satoru Tanigawa (JPN) – 13.83s
  3. Park Tae-Kyong 박태경 (KOR) – 13.89s
  4. Dongpeng Shi    史冬鹏 CHN    13.92s
  5. Mubarak Atah    SAR    14.07s
  6. Mohammed Aissa Al-Thawadi    QAT    14.26s
  7. Mohd Faiz Mohammed    MAS    14.57s
  8. Jung-Ho Lee    KOR    14.61s
Satoru Tanigawa of Japan was a far second, almost six hundredths of a second behind the then 19-year Liu Xiang. 18-year old Shi Dong Peng 史冬鹏 – the other half of the high hurdling Chinese duo – dropped out of contention for the medals after he clipped a hurdle. 2002 was the year Liu Xiang broke Renaldo Nehemiah’s world junior record, when the latter stopped the clock at 13.12s (over senior hurdles, not the junior ones!) in Lausanne, Switzerland.Fast-forward four years later in the Doha edition of the Asiad. Liu Xiang is now a household name in China, with world championship bronze and silver medals, an Olympic gold and a world record (12.88s, also set in Lausanne) to his name.

Liu was a monster in the race. He was a lot quicker in between hurdles; his technical proficiency was at a different level. Liu was the epitome of the complete sprint hurdler. Now 23-year old, Liu was approaching the peak of his physical fitness. The winning margin was not as glaring as in 2002, since Shi Dong Peng is a decent hurdler in his own right. Liu clocked 13.15s as he practically jogged to the tape once the victory was his. Big Shi ran a respectable 13.28s, one-hundredths of a second off Liu’s winning time four years ago.
2006 Doha Asian Games – 110m High Hurdles (from Wikipedia)
  1.     Liu Xiang (CHN) – 13.15s
  2.     Shi Dong Peng (CHN) – 13.28s
  3.     Naito Masato (JPN) – 13.60s
  4.     Park Tae-Kyong (KOR) – 13.67s
  5.     Tasuku Takonaka (JPN) – 13.88s
  6.     Mohammed Essa Al-Thawadi (KSA) – 13.89s
  7.     Lee Jung-Joon (KOR) – 13.91s
  8.     Hassan Mohd Robani (MAS) – 14.04s
Comparing the results of the two editions, one can see the dramatic increase in the level of competition. If the 2002 silver medalist, Tanigawa (13.83s) ran in Doha, he would have placed a dismal fifth! Perhaps the improvement in the quality of performances can be attributed to Liu Xiang’s rise to the top – and the subsequent emergence of the sprint hurdles as the centerpiece event in Asian athletics.Under much criticism, Liu was given a “free pass” to the Guangzhou Asian Games. The 2004 Olympic Champion was allowed to miss the national championships, in light of his recovery from his troublesome Achilles. I personally believe that an athlete of Liu’s stature should be given this special treatment. It’s not like he doesn’t deserve the extra lee-way. Despite all the challenges, I wish the best for my idol!

Also, godspeed to all the Filipino athletes competing in the 2011 Asiad, especially the tracksters – Arniel Ferrera (Hammer Throw), Mariz Torres (Long Jump), Henry Dagmil (Long Jump), Rosie Villarito (Javelin Throw), Danilo Fresnido (Javelin Throw), Rene Herrera (Steeplechase) and Eduardo Buenavista (Marathon).

Additional links:

David Oliver: Controlled Aggression

With injuries to both Liu Xiang 刘 翔 and Allen Johnson, I’ve been at a loss on whom to support in the best track event of all, the sprint hurdles. Of course, I root for the handful of mid- to low-13 Asian hurdlers such as Naito Masato 内藤 真人 of Japan and Dong Peng Shi 史冬鹏 of China. Although the latter had reached several World Championships finals, Asian sprint hurdlers lag behind their American and European counterparts.

Despite my admiration for Cuban athletics in general, I was indifferent to Dayron Robles (since he broke Liu’s world record!). Robles is a fine hurdler. We both compete with spectacles and were almost born on the same day and year (Robles – 17 Nov 1986. Yours truly – 18 Nov 1985). Perhaps I’m just fiercely loyal to Liu’s 12.88s.

Months ago while browsing the web, I chanced upon David Oliver‘s blog. At first glance, Oliver might seem intimidating because of his imposing physique. Built like a football player, Oliver reminds me of the great American decathlete, Milton Campbell – who won the gold medal at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics. The 6’3, 205 behemoth is a nice guy and quite approachable (watch out for David Oliver’s 10-for-10 feature!) to his growing legions of fans.

Despite his powerful physique and aggressive hurdling style, Oliver rarely hits hurdles in such a way that it hinders his forward momentum. He powers his way across the 10 barriers with a certain sense of unique elegance. Indeed, a hurdler’s style depends upon his God-given bodily faculties.  If the likes of Liu Xiang and Colin Jackson epitomize the beauty of hurdling, Oliver exudes sheer control of power.

I particularly admire one small yet important nuance of Oliver’s form, his lead foot. Sprint hurdlers usually keep their lead foot straight as the leg clears the hurdle. Some technically endowed athletes like Colin Jackson clears with a bowed lead foot to facilitate faster lead leg clearance.

An angled lead foot shortens the effective length of the lead leg (similar to the concept of dorsi-flexion); hence, resulting into faster movements for the shorter lever. Colin Jackson’s bowed lead leg is a textbook example of this advanced hurdling technique.

Oliver won the recently-concluded U.S. Outdoor Track & Field Championships with a new personal best of 12.93s – ranking him 6th among the all-time lists. He’s now as fast as the prolific Renaldo Nehemiah. and three-hundredths of a second away from Dominique Arnold‘s American record. With the top 5 times in the event this year all run by Oliver, the 28-year old Beijing Bronze Medalist is stamping his class on the rest of field.

I long for the day when the likes of a healthy Liu Xiang, Robles, Oliver, Doucoure and an injury-free Allen Johnson meet on the track. Now that’s a hurdles race everyone has to see.

Additional Links

Video of David Oliver’s 12.93s race (from Universal Sports)

IAAF Article

Photo Credits

Yahoo News

http://cache.daylife.com

http://emmabarrow.wordpress.com

Liu Xiang’s (刘翔) Comeback

Being a hardcore Liu Xiang (刘翔) fan, I must admit that it kills me to see my idol struggle. Although Liu remains his ever-cheerful self, its disconcerting to hear him say that he’s quite content with just landing a slot in the 2010 Doha World Indoor Championships or clocking a poor 13.40s to finish behind David Oliver and Shi Dong Peng 史冬鹏.

A column from Universal Sports (which is a fine source of US-oriented track & field stuff, by the way) highlights Liu’s “injury and low confidence-induced rut.” When asked about his chances for London 2012, Liu replied: “The London Olympics is too far for me. I must start from the very beginning. I am not sure about myself now.”

But then again, one has to be an athlete himself to understand where Liu Xiang is coming from. Allen Johnson’s remarks on the prospect of Liu’s recovery is enlightening: “I don’t see why not. It’s still two years away… (Liu’s problems) will pass in time, it’s just a matter of working through.”

It turns out that Johnson himself went under the knife for that same Achilles injury. Being a fixture in sprint hurdling (and being Liu’s idol), Johnson’s words come with so much wisdom.

In a sense, there is wisdom in Liu Xiang’s mindset. He’s at a stage wherein recovery is painfully slow; overexertion is a clear and present danger. Hence, having a pressure-free perspective about competing could indeed facilitate a seamless transition from recovery to top-notch performance. It’s clear that Liu does not intend to raise the bar too high, that the former World, World Indoor and Olympic Champion does not want to set too high a summit only to see himself fail in the enterprise.

Liu vs. Johnson back in 2004

Liu Xiang with his idol

Photo credits:

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn

http://olympic-spirit.blogspot.com

%d bloggers like this: